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Codeine and Promethazine-Curious About What Drank Does Or Make You Feel Like On Lean?

Can You Really Become Addicted To Drank?

Sizzurp

Sippin on syrup, lean, purple drank – whatever you call it, drinking codeine and promethazine containing cough syrup will get you high, but it’s also dangerous and since codeine is a narcotic, it’s pretty addictive. Addictive enough, in fact, that if you sip enough of that syrup, you could end up going through a heroin withdrawal like period of detox.

Made famous through southern screwed and chopped hip hop music, and centralized out of Houston, syrup killed rap artist Pimp C last year, and Lil Wayne has admitted to a serious addiction to the drug.

Getting High?

Sippin syrup will get you feeling pretty good. Codeine is an opiate, similar to other notable opiates like heroin, morphine,percocet, oxycontin or vicodin. Codeine happens to work well as a cough suppressant, but like all other opiates, it also works to control pain, and notably, to make you feel very good.

Codeine, when taken in larger than recommended doses will create feelings of contentment, euphoria, relaxation, sleepiness and well being.

Promethazine is an antihistamine, and also a CNS depressant. Promethazine works to increase the potency of the codeine. Promethazine mixed with codeine gets you higher.

Users generally mix a small amount of the cough syrup together with sprite, soda or fruit juice, and often a hard candy like a jolly rancher as well. The drink is slowly sipped leading to a sense of contentment, and well being. In larger doses, euphoria and un-coordination can result. The drink is sometimes called lean because of the way people on syrup tend to walk.

Medications That Don’t Mix With Sizzurp

  • Other narcotic pain medications, such as hydrocodone, tramadol, morphine, fentanyl, methadone, heroin and many others.
  • Alcohol
  • Antihistamine (chlorpheniramine – azatadine – brompheniramine and others)
  • Sedatives (seconal, Solfoton, Luminal, Amytal etc.)
  • Phenothiazines
  • Anti depressants
  • Any medications that warn of drowsiness or sleepiness.
  • Many others

Purple Drank

What is it?

Certain brands of prescription cough suppressant work through two active medicinal ingredients – codeine and promethazine.

Codeine is a derivative of morphine, and an opiate, and promethazine is an antihistamine. When the two drugs are taken in large quantities, both medicinal ingredients interact with one another to increase the potency of the high. As both are CNS depressants, taking the drug in large enough quantities can lead to respiratory depression, a slowing of breathing, and in severe cases, a stoppage of breathing and an overdose death. (The cough syrup is not dangerous when taken as directed, although because of its CNS depressant qualities, it should not be taken with alcohol or other CNS depressing medications.)

Addictive?

Codeine, like all opiates, is very addictive, both psychologically, and physically. If you use codeine and promethazine cough syrup for a couple of weeks, every day, you will become physically dependent on the drug. If you become physically dependent on the drug, you will need to take it every day, or more than once a day, just to keep the sickness of codeine withdrawal and detox at bay.

Although codeine is not as potent or addictive as heroin, the addiction and withdrawal symptoms share many similarities to a heroin addiction and withdrawal.

If you abuse codeine and promethazine cough syrup too regularly, you will get addicted, and getting addicted to opiates is no fun at all.

Overdose?

In large doses, you can die.

If you take it recreationally with certain other medications, you also risk an overdose.

If you use it recreationally, and you suffer from certain medical conditions, you could suffer a fatal overdose.

Opiates are central nervous system depressants. Promethazine is also a central nervous system depressant. They both slow you down, which is part of why people enjoy taking the drugs, but also why they can be quite dangerous.

These medications will slow down your breathing. If you take them in high enough doses, your breathing can slow down so much that you die from it.

If you take these medications with other CNS depressant medications (like other prescription pain killers, alcohol, certain anti depressants etc.) the addictive and cumulative effects of the medications can result in an overdose. And an overdose can result in death. Abusing codeine and promethazine recreationally is dangerous, but abusing it recreationally while taking other medications is very risky.

Pimp C died in his sleep after taking codeine and promethazine. He had sleep apnea which interfered with his breathing, and when combined with the respiratory depressive effects of the medication, killed him.

Regular users of the drug will develop a tolerance and need to take ever greater doses to get high. As you take greater doses of the CNS depressing medication, your risk of overdose increases.

Overdose Deaths

Withdrawal?

If you play for too long with codeine and promethazine, you will pay the price of a very uncomfortable detox and withdrawal period when you try to stop.

Withdrawal symptoms include:

  • Pain
  • Restless legs
  • Nausea
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Anxiousness
  • Insomnia
  • Muscle aches
  • Others

Withdrawal pains will last from a few days to a week, and can be very tough to overcome without some help.

Cough syrup doesn’t seem as scary or serious as heroin or even oxycontin but the withdrawal period is rough, and you will probably need some help to get off.

Withdrawal Options

To get off, you can

  1. Go cold turkey
  2. Wean yourself off
  3. Get into an opiate substitution program – like methadone or Suboxone.

A cold turkey detox is fastest, but toughest.

Weaning yourself off the medication can work, and if you have the discipline, and are in no real rush, can be a reasonably effective way to get off the drug. The key to weaning down off of codeine and promethazine is not to hurry. Try going down by 10-20%. Reduce your daily dosage by 10-20% and wait until that feels ok before attempting to again reduce the dosage.

A good tip is to have a trusted friend or family member control your access to the medication, to ensure that you actually stay on course with your daily dosage reductions. Have a friend (preferably a sober friend) mix the drinks for a while.

The last option is to participate in an opiate substitution program, like methadone or suboxone (buprenorphine). These are medications that you take instead of the cough syrup. They will keep you from feeling sick, but will not get you high. You will gradually need to reduce your dosage off of these medications.

Be careful

Opiates are fun. They feel good and they are seductive, and it’s so easy to get sucked into an addiction.

It doesn’t take long at all, and before you know it – you’re a junky, and once you are, getting off is tough.

If you’re not yet addicted, make sure you stay that way. If you plan on continuing to use codeine and promethazine recreationally, make sure you don’t get high every day. The more often you get high, the greater your risk of addiction.

If you’re thinking about experimenting with a little purple drank – wondering what all the fuss is about – make sure you understand the risks, and think hard about whether or not it’s worth it.

 Mississippi Sipp

MDMA: Does The Name “Molly” Drug Ring A Bell? Popped A Molly Im Sweating Wooo!

MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methamphetamine) is an empathogenic drug of the phenethylamine and amphetamine classes of drugs. MDMA has become widely known as “ecstasy” (shortened to “E“, “X“, or “XTC“), usually referring to its street pill form, although this term may also include the presence of possible adulterants. The term “molly” or “mandy” colloquially refers to MDMA in powder or crystalline form, usually implying a higher level of purity.[3]

MDMA can induce euphoria, a sense of intimacy with others, and diminished anxiety. Many studies, particularly in the fields of psychology and cognitive therapy, have suggested that MDMA has therapeutic benefits and facilitates therapy sessions in certain individuals, a practice for which it had formally been used in the past. Clinical trials are now testing the therapeutic potential of MDMA for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and anxiety associated with terminal cancer.[4][5]

MDMA is criminalized in most countries (though some civil society initiatives—such as the Global Commission on Drug Policy—consider educating the public about the drug more important than curtailing supply[6]) and its possession, manufacture, or sale may result in criminal prosecution. Some limited exceptions exist for scientific and medical research. For 2008 the UN estimated between 10–25 million people globally used MDMA at least once in the past year. This was broadly similar to the number of cocaine, amphetamine and opioid users, but far fewer than the global number of cannabis users.[7] It is taken in a variety of contexts far removed from its roots in psychotherapeutic settings and is commonly associated with dance parties (or “raves”) and electronic dance music.[8]

Regulatory authorities in several locations around the world have approved scientific studies administering MDMA to humans to examine its therapeutic potential and its effects.[9]

Medical use

See also: Effects of MDMA on the human body

There have long been suggestions that MDMA might be useful in psychotherapy, facilitating self-examination with reduced fear.[10][11][12] Indeed, some therapists, including Leo Zeff, Claudio Naranjo, George Greer, Joseph Downing, and Philip Wolfson, used MDMA in their practices until it was made illegal. George Greer synthesized MDMA in the lab of Alexander Shulgin and administered it to about 80 of his clients over the course of the remaining years preceding MDMA’s Schedule I placement in 1985. In a published summary of the effects,[13] the authors reported patients felt improved in various mild psychiatric disorders and experienced other personal benefits, especially improved intimate communication with their significant others. In a subsequent publication on the treatment method, the authors reported that one patient with severe pain from terminal cancer experienced lasting pain relief and improved quality of life.[14]

Recently, two randomized controlled trials of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD were published. Although small, these trials are consistent with earlier results. The patients treated with 2-3 sessions of MDMA-psychotherapy showed greater improvement than the ones treated by placebo-psychotherapy[15] or placebo-inactive dose of MDMA.[16] This improvement was generally maintained on a follow-up several years later.[17]

Small doses of MDMA are used as an entheogen to enhance prayer or meditation by some religious practitioners.[18]

Main article: Poly drug use

MDMA is occasionally known for being taken in conjunction with psychedelic drugs, such as LSD or psilocybin mushrooms, or even common drugs such as cannabis. As this practice has become more prevalent, most of the more common combinations have been given nicknames, such as “candy flipping” for MDMA combined with LSD, “hippy flipping” for MDMA with psilocybin mushrooms, or “kitty flipping” for MDMA with ketamine.[19] The term “flipping” may come from the subjective effects of using MDMA with a psychedelic in which the user may shift rapidly between a more lucid state and a more psychedelic state several times during the course of their experience. Many users use mentholated products while taking MDMA for its cooling sensation while experiencing the drug’s effects. Examples include menthol cigarettes, Vicks VapoRub, NyQuil,[20] and lozenges.

Subjective effects

The primary effects attributable to MDMA consumption are predictable and fairly consistent among users. In general, users begin reporting subjective effects within 30–60 minutes of consumption, hitting a peak at approximately 75–120 minutes, reaching a plateau that lasts about 3.5 hours.[21] This is followed by a comedown of a few hours. After the drug has run its course, many users report feeling fatigue.

The following subjective effects of MDMA were statistically significant in a placebo-controlled trial, using Altered States of Consciousness rating scale: derealization, depersonalization, altered perception of space and time, positive basic mood, mania-like experience, anxious derealization, thought disorder, fears of loss of thought or body control, visual hallucinations or pseudo-hallucinations, synesthesia, changed meaning of percepts, facilitated recollection or imagination. On an Adjective Mood rating scale, the following measurements were significantly increased: self-confidence, heightened mood, apprehension-anxiety, thoughtfulness-contemplativeness, extroversion, dazed state, sensitivity and emotional excitation.[21]

Adverse effects

In January 2001, an overview of the subjective side-effects of MDMA was published by Liechti, Gamma, and Vollenweider in the journal Psychopharmacology. Their paper was based on clinical research conducted over several years involving 74 healthy volunteers. The researchers found that there were a number of common side-effects and that many of the effects seemed to occur in different amounts based on the sex of the user. The top side-effects reported were difficulty concentrating, jaw clenching, grinding of the teeth during sleep, lack of appetite, and dry mouth/thirst (all occurring in more than 50% of the 74 volunteers). Liechti, et al., also measured some of the test subjects for blood pressure, heart rate, and body temperature against a placebo control but no statistically significant changes were seen.[21][22]

A study from Johns Hopkins Medical School in 2008 found a slight but significant correlation of cognitive deficiency in MDMA users, but admitted that this data may be confounded by other illicit drug use. The significant finding of the article was the serotonergic neurotoxicity in stacked doses and a lasting decrease in serotonin reuptake (SERT) binding. In rats, high doses and in high temperatures, serotonergic neurotoxicity is limited and dopaminergic neurotoxicity occurs. However, rats may not be a generalizable model for human neurotoxicity studies.[23]

However, a 2011 study carried out by Harvard Medical School and published in the journal Addiction found no signs of cognitive impairment due to ecstasy use, and that it did not decrease mental ability. The report also raised concerns that previous methods used to conduct that research on ecstasy had been flawed, and the experiments overstated the cognitive differences between ecstasy users and nonusers.[24]

After-effects

Effects reported by some users once the acute effects of MDMA have worn off include:

  • Psychological
    • Anxiety and paranoia
    • Depression[25][26][27][28]
    • Irritability[26]
    • Fatigue[27][28]
    • Impaired attention, focus, and concentration, as well as drive and motivation (due to depleted serotonin levels)[25]
    • Residual feelings of empathy, emotional sensitivity, and a sense of closeness to others (afterglow)
  • Physiological
    • Dizziness, lightheadedness, or vertigo[28]
    • Loss of appetite[25]
    • Gastrointestinal disturbances, such as diarrhea or constipation
    • Insomnia[25]
    • Aches and pains, usually from excessive physical activity (e.g., dancing)[25][27]
    • Exhaustion[26][28]
    • Jaw soreness, from bruxism[28][29][30]

A slang term given to the depressive period following MDMA consumption is Tuesday Blues (or “Suicide Tuesday”), referring to the low mood that can be experienced midweek by depleted serotonin levels following MDMA use on the previous Friday or Saturday when raves or dance concerts were frequently scheduled. Some users report that consuming 5-HTP, L-Tryptophan and vitamins the day after use can reduce the depressive effect by replenishing serotonin levels (magnesium supplements are also used prior to or during use, in an attempt to prevent jaw/muscle clenching).[31]

Molly Drug Facts and Information was brought to you on behalf of WIKI: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MDMA

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What Is All The Hype,Talk On The Streets & Rappers Rapping About The New MDMA Molly Drug?

 

Is Molly illegal?

Yes and no. Molly is legal in New York state and under federal law. But a user can be charged with possession of an imitation controlled substance. A user can also be charged under the Federal Analog Act, which makes illegal any drug that is an analog, or derivative, of a controlled substance. Learn more about Molly legality in Onondaga County.

How do local officials define Molly?

Molly is a mixture of plant fertilizer out of China, New Zealand or Australia, and other types of synthetic drugs that appear to give the same high as ecstasy or MDMA. Learn more about how Onondaga County’s District Attorney’s office defines Molly.

Why is it called Molly?

Nobody knows. Local officials speculate the slang term “sounds cool” to the people who originally created Molly.

Where is Molly found?

Law enforcement officials seize Molly from private residences and local apartments on and near Syracuse University’s campus. Murfreesboro, Tenn., and Marin County, Calif., also cite surges in Molly use during the last year. See where else Molly has been found using our interactive map.

Who uses Molly?

Molly use is popular in Syracuse suburbs, and on and around college campuses. Learn more about why Molly is popular in the suburb and college demographics.

Why do some users consider Molly “safer?”

Molly is sold as pure MDMA, which means unlike ecstasy, it’s not supposed to be cut with any fillers or other drugs. However, there is no sure way to know what is in Molly without a forensic test.

What are Molly bath salts?

In some parts of the country, Molly bath salts are marketed as similar to synthetic marijuana, called “spice” or “K2″. They’re labeled as bath products, but Internet commenters describe the experience of sniffing them as creating effects similar to “legal cocaine” or “legal speed.” Learn more about the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency’s investigation into bath salts, K2 and “legal marijuana”.

What is Molly’s Plant Food?

Molly’s Plant Food is a synthetic hallucinogenic amphetamine marketed as a “plant food” that contains ingredients that produce highs similar to Ecstasy. Molly’s Plant Food is usually purchased at a convenience store. The label warns “not for human consumption”; however it is packaged in a psychedelic colored wrapper and several Internet web sites and chat rooms refer to the product as “legal ecstasy”. The active ingredient is mephedrone, which is not a scheduled (DEA) drug, therefore making it legal.

What is mephedrone?

Mephedrone, as well as ketamine, are designer amphetamine drugs that have been found in tests of Molly.

How will Molly affect me?

Molly affects users in a number of ways. Most significantly, it causes craving and addiction in the brain, but it can also lead to changes in mood, body temperature, etc. Learn more about the diverse effects of Molly.

What will happen if I mix Molly with another drug?

Most of the time, Molly is mixed with another drug. The effects strongly depend on your tolerance, what drug it is mixed with, and how much of each drug is used. Learn more about the difference between mixing Molly with a stimulant versus a depressant.

How addictive is Molly?

Molly, as a term used to describe pure MDMA, is addictive in the sense that users will experience what is called “tissue dependency.” The body can become dependent on the stimulant effects that the drug provides. This type of dependency is what leads the body to crash after the drug wears off. Users will feel the urge to take another dose in order to get the stimulant effect again.

MDMA is both hallucinogenic and stimulant, but the stimulant properties are most likely to lead to addiction. If Molly is cut with another stimulant, such as cocaine or amphetamine, the addictiveness increases.

Can you overdose on Molly?

Yes. It is rare for a death to be caused entirely by Molly or MDMA, but it is possible to overdose. The typical recreational dose ranges from 80-150 milligrams (200+ mg is considered a heavy dosage). Going beyond that can result in a number of things, most likely vomiting, headaches and dizziness.

 

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